Super Simple Scarf (pattern)

Last year, I knitted a super simple scarf. A number of people complemented on it, and kept on asking for a pattern. Though this one is super simple, I promised to write them a pattern for it. So here you are: Super Simple Scarf. And because this is a super simple scarf, it’s also a super simple pattern: I’ve also omitted all the abbreviations.

Addition: You can also find this pattern in Ravelry (though at the moment it links back to this blog). Thinking about turning this into a pdf, too.

Super Simple Scarf

Super Simple Scarf

Yarn used Madame Tricote Dora Sim, 93% acrylic, 7% Sim-metallic (250 m/100 g, suggested needle size 3–3,5 mm), finished scarf took up 138 grams of yarn
Needles 5,5 mm (I prefer circulars)
Gauge stockinette stitch 16 stitches and 23 rows/10 cm

Please note that this pattern goes with any yarn and the size of the scarf is easily adjustable, and the amount of yarn needed is relative to yarn chosen and the size wanted. This scarf is best when soft, so choose your needles big enough (I suggest trying out needles a lot bigger than the suggested needle size for your chosen yarn is).

Cast on 5 stitches. Knit all stitches, including the first and the last stitch. Turn the scarf. Knit the first stitch, purl the rest, except knit the last one. Turn again.

Now begin the super simple pattern:
1) On the right side, always knit the first two stitches, yarn over, knit until two stitches remain, yarn over, knit the last two stitches.
2) On the wrong side, knit the first stitch, then purl until one stitch remains, and knit that last stitch.

That is, the width of the scarf is increased by two stitches on every right side, and in between the increases, there’s always an uneven number of stitches.

Repeat these two rows until the scarf is approximately 2 cm shorter than the finished scarf. Mine was about 70 cm when I began the final rows.

Super Simple Scarf

Final rows:
On the right side, knit the first two stitches, yarn over, repeat knit 2 together and yarn over until three stitches remain, knit 1 stitch, yarn over, and knit the final two stitches.
On the wrong side, knit the first stitch, purl until 1 stitch remains, and knit the last stitch.

Cast-off:
Cast off loosely in you preferred cast off method. Weave in the ends of the yarns, and block the scarf. Since my scarf was to wear for training, I never blocked it, and therefore it keeps rolling.

Super Simple Scarf

There you go – this was a super simple scarf, wasn’t it?

Super Simple Scarf

Ja sama suomeksi:

Supersimppeli huivi

käytetty lanka Madame Tricote Dora Sim, 93 % akryylia, 7 % Sim-metallic (250 m/100 g, suositeltu puikkokoko 3–3,5 mm), minun huiviini upposi 138 grammaa lankaa
puikot 5,5 mm (suosin pyöröpuikkoja)
tiheys sileää neuletta 16 silmukkaa ja 23 kerrosta/10 cm

Huomaathan, että tämän mallin voi kutoa millä langalla tahansa, ja huivin kokoa voi helposti säädellä haluamakseen – tämä luonnollisesti vaikuttaa langan menekkiin. Valitse puikkokoko siten, että saat mieleistäsi jälkeä. Tämä malli on parhaimmillaan, kun huivi on pehmeä, joten kannattaa kokeilla reilusti suurempaa puikkokokoa kuin langan suosituksena on.

Luo 5 silmukkaa. Kudo kaikki silmukat oikein, mukaan luettuna ensimmäinen ja viimeinen silmukka. Käännä työ. Kudo ensimmäinen silmukka oikein, kaikki muut nurin paitsi kerroksen viimeinen silmukka jälleen oikein. Käännä jälleen.

Aloita supersimppeli mallikerta:
1) Oikealla puolella kudo aina kaksi ensimmäistä silmukkaa oikein, tee langankierto, kudo silmukat oikein, kunnes puikolla on enää kaksi silmukkaa, tee langankierto ja kudo viimeiset kaksi silmukkaa oikein.
2) Nurjalla puolella kudo ensimmäinen silmukka oikein, sen jälkeen kaikki nurin paitsi viimeistä silmukkaa, joka kudotaan jälleen oikein.

Toisin sanoen huivi levenee kahdella silmukalla jokaisella oikean puolen kerroksella, ja langankiertojen välissä on aina pariton määrä silmukoita.

Toista näitä kahta kerrosta, kunnes huivi on noin 2 cm lyhyempi kuin valmiina. Oma huivini oli tässä kohti noin 70 cm kärjestä mitattuna.

Super Simple Scarf

Viimeiset kerrokset:
Oikealla puolella kudo oikein kaksi ensimmäistä silmukkaa, tee langankierto. Tämän jälkeen toista 2 yhteen ja langankierto -yhdistelmää, kunnes jäljellä on kolme silmukkaa. Kudo 1 silmukka oikein, tee langankierto ja kudo viimeiset kaksi silmukkaa oikein.
Nurjalla puolella kudo ensimmäinen silmukka oikein, sen jälkeen kaikki nurin paitsi viimeinen silmukka, joka kudotaan jälleen oikein.

Päättely:
Päättele löysästi mieleiselläsi päättelytekniikalla. Päättele langanpäät, kastele ja pingota huivi. Omaa huiviani ei ole pingotettu, koska se tehtiin harjoitteluhuiviksi. Tämän vuoksi huivini reunat tuppaavat rullautumaan.

Kuten todettua, tämä on supersimppeli huivi.

Super Simple Scarf

Headware x 7

My autumn season has been full of hat-knitting projects.

I had had a fun-looking pattern Zportz (Ravelry link) in my queue for ages. Kids chose their favourite colour combinations, and off I went with knitting.

Zportz

The first one (Ravelry link) knitted was in orange and black. The needles were 3,0 mm for the ribbing and 3,5 mm for the hat. I had some trouble with the yarn loops, tended to make them too small, but it turned out wearable. Yarn Novita Nalle Aloe Vera and Novita Nalle.

Zportz in orange

The second one (Ravelry link) was easier to knit, now that I had had the hang of it. Purple yarn Novita Wool, white Novita Nalle, and I also chose a bit bigger needles: 3,5 mm for the ribbing and 4,0 mm for the hat.

Zportz in purple

For the third one (Ravelry link) I dared to do some modifications. I knitted an extra first part of the pattern to make the hat more slouchy. Pity that in our shop nearby there were no hot pink yarn, kid would have loved that even better. As it is, we had to settle for pale pink and white yarn (Novita Nalle).

Zportz in pink

Zportz is a nice-looking hat which is somewhat easy to knit, once you remember to make the yarn loops long enough.

Zportz

The pattern presented itself: looks good in any colour combination. And so it does!
Zportz

***

Since kid wanted a hot pink hat, that’s what she got (Ravelry link).

Pink hat

I’m not into acrylic, but since the colour was more important than the material, we picked up Madame Tricota Star (100% acrylic) for this hat. Acrylic is nice to knit, though, and as a seasonal accessority it quite nicely does it’s job. Needles 3,5 mm for the ribbing and 4,0 mm for the hat.

Pink hat

The other kid picked up a skein of Madame Tricot Angora (40% angora, 60% acrylic) and wanted to have a hat knitted of it (Ravelry link). I was a bit worried of the colour changes, I didn’t want this one to end up striped-looking, so I decided to make it in a different manner: with shortened rows. Needles 3,5 mm for the ribbing and 4,0 mm for the rest of the hat.

Keinulauta

The result was quite nice, and the shortened rows with a few rows of purl and knit were a nice choise for this hat. I’m considering making another hat like this, but with a different yarn.

Keinulauta

While knitting the previous one, I decided to use the shortened rows in a bit more complex manner (Ravelry link).

Kaltevalla pinnalla

Knitting knit only, this one didn’t turn out as nice, but kid loved it anyway. Yarn Novita Nalle Alove Vera and Novita Nalle, needles 3,5 mm for the ribbing and 4,0 mm for the rest.

Kaltevalla pinnalla

Need to give this idea another go, too.

Kaltevalla pinnalla

***

One more hat, this time for myself (Ravelry link). It’s yet another version of the popular pattern Habitat (Ravelry link).

Habitat #3

I had some leftover Novita Isoveli Colori yarn, which I thought would be perfect for this pattern. Needles were 4,5 mm for the ribbing and 5,0 mm for the rest of the hat.

This one being my third version Habitat, I found it progressing nice and quick: in a couple of nights I had finished it. I’m not all that fond of thick yarn and thick needles, but hopefully this hat will keep my ears warm in a colder weather.

Habitat #3

Light and pink and loving it (pinks, part 3)

This sweater has been nearly-there for a few weeks; only the buttons were missing. A couple of days ago I finally had time to go button-hunting, and I was happy to find nice ones on the first go. Let me present, my 10 day sweater (Ravelry link to the pattern) (which definitely wasn’t finished in 10 days, due to several other projects).

10 days

This pattern is by Villapeikko. The simplicity immidiately caught my eye, and as I realized I had some nice yarn in my stash, I put it in the top-five of my queue. I began my 10 Days (Ravelry link) in late April, and despite of rather thin yarn it was quite quick to knit, thanks to needles of 4 mm.

The yarn I chose for this sweater is old Novita Wool (100% wool) which I bought several years ago from sale, and the contrast colour was some random skein of off-white Novita Wool. The amount of yarn needed was less than 450 grams.

10 days

Though somewhat simple, there are a lot of nice details to this sweater. The hem is asymmetrical, and there’s a button band for decoration.

10 days

Similar button bands can be found in the front, too. Since I have no intention of unbuttoning the sweater, there are no button holes.

10 days

In the original pattern, the sleeves were knitted in reverse stockinette. In my sweater, I decided to knit the sleeves in stockinette instead. There were also a few more of the purled stripes in the cuffs of the pattern, but I only knitted five of them.

10 days

This sweater is light and soft and lovely to wear. The size is perfect, and the sleeves are exactly the right lenght. I’m sure this will be my number one summer sweater in the coming years.

10 days

This sweater completes my straight flush of pink sweaters. There’s more pink on my needles, though – I was nearly running out of UFO’s, so I balanced out the situation by casting on a couple of projects during the weekend. Don’t hold your breath, though; it might takea a while or two before those are finished.

The best sweater ever (pinks, part 2)

I have my suspicions what comes to bulky yarn and thick needles. I had bought eight skeins of pink Novita Saana (100% wool) from sale a few years back, and I had a pullover in mind. But the perfect pattern?

There it was, in Hold your needles by Tikru and Villapeikko. Pattern called Paju (Ravelry link) by Tikru looked appealing to me, and since the yarn weight was a close-enough match, there was no need to look any further. (Ravelry link to my Paju)

Paju on needles

It was a rather quick and easy project to knit. Reading the errata available in Ravelry is a good idea, though. (Of course I first struggled and only then went to Ravelry to look for help.)

Paju

My choise for the needles were 5,5 mm (the suggested needle-size for the yarn is 6 mm). Above the waist, I knitted the leaf-pattern for one extra time, to make sure that the waist decreases were to land on my waist and not above.

Paju

The yarn was so thick that I split the ends in two before weaving them in. That way the ends are perfectly invisible.

I knitted the (turtle)neck until I was running out of yarn. I had left quite long ends for sewing the underarms, but that was no exaggeration: to make the stitches in the underarms nice and tight I had to use every bit of yarn I had. But as they say: if there was enough, then there was enough.

Paju

I had my suspicions on how this sweater would turn out. I’m happy to say that it turned out perfect. The size I chose was perfect, the colour is perfect, the pattern was fun (and quick!) to knit and it looks light and it’s a dream to wear.

Now I’m just asking: how long until the chilly weather?

Paju

(Do note the background. During the photoshoot there was heavy rain. Thank goodness for verandahs.)

Pink(ish) for summer and winter

I’m rather true to myself in choosing colours. I had an old, old yarn Rondo Pinja (35 % cotton, 48 % acetate, 11 % acrylic, 6 % polyester) by Helsingin Villakehräämö Oy/Rondo. I assume that the yarn is from the 1990’s or perhaps even older than that.

Pinkish for summer

(Please, ignore my serious trouble trying to keep my eyes open. Blame it on the sun.)

Began this project in June 2008 (Ravelry link). The yarn was hidious to knit (needle size 5), but I just love the bulky texture with pink, purple and gray stripes on white.

Pinkish for summer

Had difficulty first picking out the pattern, figuring out the right shape for the sleeves and finally figuring out the neckline.

The sweater is knit in stockinette stitch, with a touch of lace on sleeves, hem and neckline. Could have given the sweater some more shape around the waist, but the yarn was rather unpredictable.

Pinkish for summer

I finished the sweater in 2009, but only managed to weave in the ends last summer (no news). Today I finally wore it for the first time, apart from the photo shoot.

*****

My all-time favourite shade of Nalle Colori (75% wool, 25% nylon) is definitely the one with pink and grey.

Earlier, I had knit a wine-coloured sweater with V-shaped neckline and simple stockinette and lace texture. I’ve worn that sweater so much, though it turned out to be too loose and over the years it has lost all it’s shape.

Therefore I decided to make another, but perhaps a bit more fitting one, of my favourite colours (Ravelry link).

Pinkish for winter

Well, I might have gone a bit overboard with trying to make the pattern fit better. On the other hand, if this sweater does the same as the one before, this will be more or less loose in no time.

A little bit of extra length would have not hurt, though – I tend to like my sweaters a bit longer than this.

Pinkish for winter

Began the project in November 2010 and knitted it every once in a while, making slow progress. Finally took up sewing the seams a week ago. Yes, why hurry?

Pinkish for winter

Two more pink projects to present. Stay tuned!

Quick(ish) items

Presenting a couple of items which have been my knit-these-if-you-have-no-inspiration-to-knit-anything-else projects. Theoretically quick(ish), but slow in my manner.

legwarmers for kid

Legwarmers (Ravelry link) of Novita Polku, needles 3 mm. Simple legwarmers with k2,p1 ribbing.

The legwarmers are nice and soft, but the yarn is no pleasure to knit. Well, been there, tried that. Used 55 grams of yarn for these legwarmers, so I have almost half a skein to use up (plus another skein of different colourway).

legwarmers for kid

*****

baktus in wine

I have knitted one Baktus scarf before (my first Baktus). It was an easy and fun project to use up random balls of yarn, so I decided to do it again.

I had a 50-gram ball plus scraps of an old Novita Bella yarn (50% acrylic, 50% wool). It turned into a nice small scarf (Ravelry link).

Needle 5 mm, used moss stitch instead of garter stitch, 57 grams altogether.

baktus in wine

I thought I knitted this Baktus for me, but there were many of those who volunteered to take this one into a good use. We’ll see who ends up wearing it in a few months.

baktus in wine

Coming up next: a streight flush in pink pullovers.

Habitat revisited

I knit my first Habitat in 2009. I enjoyed the pattern that required a bit of concentration, and thought that it might be fun to knit another one.

So I casted on my second Habitat in the end of 2009. Unfortunately, I had not enough time to knit it, and after a lengthy break in knitting and messing up several rows of the pattern, I grew tired of the project. So it ended up in my ever-growing pile of ufos.

This spring, I was participating a school field camp as a supervisor. I assumed that I’d have plenty of time for knitting, so I filled up my suitcase with yarn and ufos and patterns – and a couple of good books.

Habitat

Once I got the hang of it, the pattern was once again lovely to knit. So I knit and read and knit and read. The project took up 110 grams of yarn (Novita Saana, 100% wool, needles 4.5 mm and 5 mm), and it turned out significantly bigger than my first Habitat.

Habitat

A bit oversized, perhaps. But not badlooking the way it is – at least if one wears it on the forehead and not over the eyes.

Habitat

Up to knee and above

Kneesocks

Felt like knitting some over-knee socks, toe-up, and Novita Tico Tico (75% wool, 25% nylon, 2.5 mm needles) seemed like a nice yarn to knit them of.

Kneesocks

I started off with purple ones in January 2011 (Ravelry link). Knitting, as usual, was fun, but having to try them on to figure out the perfect shape made the process a bit slow.

What really slowed me down was knitting the second sock with all increases. I had written notes in Ravelry, though, but by the time I got to the calf increases, I had forgotten all the increase patterns and had to check my notes all the time.

Kneesocks

So I decided that I reallyreallyreally need a second set of bambu needles, so I can knit two socks simultaneously. (I know, magic loop could do the trick, too, but I prefer knitting socks with sock needles.)

For the second pair of over-knee socks (Ravelry link) I also needed a second ball of yarn, but that was from a different dye lot. Therefore I didn’t try to match the stripes, I just casted on from the beginning of the yarn.

Kneesocks

When I was a kid, I knitted myself a pair of knee socks with cables on the side. Found some sock yarn (Novita Tuomas, 40% wool, 35% nylon, 25% polyamid) in the local shop and decided to knit socks as high as they’d come. This simple cabletwist on both sides wasn’t the best choise of patterns, but it gave me something to keep myself on the track while knitting (Ravelry link).

The yarn was rather harsh on my hands, but I assume the yarn was made for heavy-use socks. Well, come to think of it, my use at home seems to be heavy-use, concidering the number of socks that I have worn out just by using them at home indoors.

This sums up my knee sock projects of 2011 (pair 1) and the first half of 2012 (pairs 2 & 3). Come to think of it, these might cover the second half of 2012, too.

Kneesocks

Sirle x 2

Sirle

Continuing with the fo’s of 2011. Kids had been longing for oversized beanies. Once Villapeikko published her Sirle beanie pattern in Ulla 3/2011, I immidiately went shopping for yarn.

The detail that I first caught my eye in Sirle, was the ribbing that was shaped with short rows in order to make the ribbing narrower in the neck and wider in the front.

Kid wanted a white beanie, just like in the pattern, so that’s what she got (Ravelry link). I bought a skein of Laurin villalanka, which I had never knitted before. Using needles of 3.5 mm, the finished beanie took up 71 grams of yarn. It didn’t turn out as oversized as I (or to be exact, kid) expected, but yet it was worn a lot over the winter.

Sirle

For kid number 2, I also bought a skein of Laurin villalanka but in grey. I used 3.5 mm needles again and did everything exactly like in Sirle number 1, but still the beanie turned out more of oversized kind, and the kid was quite happy with the result.

Sirle number 2 (Ravelry link) took up 85 grams of yarn, so no wonder it turned out bigger. Even though it was the same yarn, it had a different feel to it both as a ball and while knitting. I also have a couple of skeins of the same yarn in red, and that seems to be more alike the white yarn. (Note to self: in a future, do not attempt to combine grey with any other colour.)

Kids loved these beanies, and I loved knitting them. That makes Sirle a perfect pattern, doesn’t it?

Sirle

Musica in grey

Musica

To continue my shades of grey, here’s the final one. I cast it on in the beginning of January 2011 but only finished last winter. The pattern for Musica mittens (Ravelry link) was found in Ulla 3/2009.

Musica

It was a different kind of pattern for mittens, with ribbing (above) that was knitted sideways.

Musica

There were also plenty of cables and texture, which made them fun to knit. The picture above shows the palm side of the mitten.

Musica

At first I thought I’d make these mittens with lining, but since the mitten didn’t turn out too big, I ended up leaving them as they are. Yarn was (again) Nalle with 3.5 mm needles.

Musica

I loved all the details in these mittens; there was even a small cable on the thumb. Just beautiful mittens, they are.

Musica